No barrier to improved blast performance

An internationally patented structural water-sealing barrier designed to significantly improve blasting performance has been launched by Australian blasting technology company BlastBoss.
Dryshot was developed during an intensive three-year program and will be marketed globally to the mining, quarrying and civil engineering industries.

The product is a blended powder used as a multipurpose barrier to instantly seal off explosives from problematic water and mud in standard blast holes and stop stemming dilution into explosives in large diameter holes.

Dryshot can isolate toe water and mud, creating a dry hole for the immediate loading of explosives, or can be placed on top of explosives or stemming to stop water ingress contamination.

On detonation, the Dryshot-capped toe water attenuates and increases the duration of the blast pressure to achieve higher energy delivery and extended and greatly increased rock fracturing, while using much less explosive.

Dryshot requires no pumping, which speeds up the blast hole loading process and increases optimisation. It is delivered as an easy-to-use dry powder that can be used with all explosive products and applied as part of standard loading procedures.

It can also provide protection for ‘sleeping’ blast holes and explosives in wet environments where surface water is present, turning wet blast holes into dry blast holes instantly.

Blastboss Chief Executive Officer David Handel said Dryshot was developed to revolutionise the global blasting industry, greatly reducing the cost per blast to operators while maximising production through increased operational, processing and transportation efficiency.

“I continuously saw the ongoing blasting challenges faced by the mining, quarrying and civil engineering industries throughout my 30-plus years as a director of a leading global fine particle management company,” he said.

“Traditional blasting methods can cause increased costs in production, processing and transportation and adverse environmental effects including exposure to dangerous fumes and excessive dust, noise and vibration.

“I saw the need to completely change the current blasting processes and worked with leading chemists, physicists and engineers to invent the Dryshot technology.”

Mr Handel said the new technology had the potential to significantly improve efficiencies in blasting.

“Dryshot can reduce the amount of explosives required in blast holes by up to 35 per cent, and in some cases, more, using contained and controlled hydraulic energy to redirect and intensify the blast wave forces generated by ammonium nitrate explosives, delivering better rock breaking results,” he said.

“Containing and controlling water in the blast hole leads to a lower powder factor, lower MIC and less fume, while maintaining or even improving fragmentation.

“Using Dryshot creates confined water decks where, upon detonation, hydraulic energy is harnessed to generate significantly more and extended tensile cracking in the surrounding rock mass.

“This effect is the reason the reduction in the powder factor shows no reduction in fragmentation quality or increased toe when applied correctly.”

Picture: David Handel.

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