EVO system halves maintenance downtime

Routine maintenance is required on a P&H 4100XPC electric rope shovel after every 30,000 hours of operation.

These machines – which are used on coal in Australia – require maintenance in which the upper section is lifted off the car body to machine bearing surfaces and inspect and repair structural components.

Weighing approximately 907,000kg, lifting the upper car body requires a significant amount of force and control.

The maintenance team at Joy Global (now part of Komatsu) reached out to Enerpac to deliver a shovel lift system to undock a P&H 4100XPC shovel in approximately one hour and be transported on the highway without oversized load permits.

The EVO synchronous lift technology involved in this lift provided the speed and safety that were critical components in reducing labour and equipment.

Solution

The EVO system included four 450-tonne cylinders with 72 inches of stroke (approximately 1829mm), an EVO synchronous control unit and four custom 8000 series hydraulic pumps.

Each pump was built to operate in extremely cold or hot environments. Enerpac Australasian Mining and Heavy Lift Solutions Manager Warren Baltineshter said the company had previously built a similar shovel lift system for Joy Global’s maintenance team in Chile. 

“The second-generation system built for Joy Global’s service team in Gillette, Wyoming provided significantly more speed,” he said.

The EVO synchronous control unit enabled a single operator to control the entire lift and ensure each lifting point remained within 9.525mm. The shovel was successfully undocked in approximately one hour and the entire system was transported on the highway without oversized load permits.

EVO lift system

Enerpac EVO synchronous lifting systems replace manual control of hydraulic heavy lifting with PLC control of multiple cylinder lifts, offering accuracy, safety and productivity benefits for precision lifting of heavy resources industry machinery.

The EVO system is the evolutionary result of Enerpac’s 25 years of experience in specialised hydraulic engineering and lifting technology, using digitally controlled hydraulics to accurately and safely lift some of the largest and most challenging structures on earth.

Recent examples range from 1360-tonne grinding mills in Western Australia to the super lifting and launch of a 39,000-tonne floating oil production system in Malaysia for the Gumusut-Kakap offshore field.

The latest EVO synchronous system offers eight standard hydraulic control modes and can control four, eight or 12 points with one hydraulic power unit (HPU). A master control unit is also available that offers daisy chain control of multiple EVO systems, giving a maximum of 192 lifting points.

“With synchronous lifting, one operator controls the entire precision lifting process, during which the status of every lifting point is constantly monitored and displayed,” Mr Baltineshter said.

“Time saving is another advantage of synchronous lifting. The process does not have to be stopped after any incremental value, checked, manually re-measured and corrected. The EVO system carries out these actions during the entire lifting process. Depending on the application, time savings up to 60 per cent can be achieved.”

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