City of Albany Mayor Dennis Wellington says the owner of a lime quarry in Nullaki will foot the bill for any damage to roads in the area caused by trucks accessing the site.

Residents in the area raised concerns the estimated 28 daily truck movements at the Eden Road mine, which was granted approval by the State Administrative Tribunal last month despite twice being rejected by the City, would put strain on the road surfaces.

But Youngs Siding resident and O’Connor Greens candidate Nelson Blake Gilmour said once the lime pit proponent upgraded the roads for the mining operation, the City of Albany would be responsible for maintaining it.

“We’re talking about 28 trucks a day using that road for the next 20 years, (with) 50,000 tonnes of lime per year coming in and out from that mine site.

“So I could imagine there will be a lot of wear and tear on those roads and the ratepayers could be the one footing the bill.”

However, Mr Wellington said despite the roads falling under local government jurisdiction, the lime pit proponent would be responsible for repairing any damage.

“If his trucks caused any damage to the road then he will be the one who will be conducting the maintenance for that,” he said.

“Normal wear and tear will be accepted, but if the trucks caused any damage we told him that he will be the one paying for it.”

Lime pit proponent Graeme Robertson said he was prepared to maintain the cost of the road himself.

“The maintenance cost is not going to come out of the residents’ pocket,” he said.

Nullaki Community Action Group Committee Member John Cullen said the road conditions near the lime pit needed constant maintenance already.

“Even with the little traffic that we get here, the roads need constant maintenance already,” he said.

“Especially during the winter — it got badly corrugated.

“So once the lime pit is operational, the damage to the road would increase and we don’t want to be paying for it.”

 

Image: Albany Mayor Dennis Wellington, Albany Advertiser