Western Australia’s Chamber of Minerals and Energy has requested members co-operate with a survey of the impact of fly-in, fly-out workforces on Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

The message comes after a “productive” meeting between CME WA Boss Paul Everingham and the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder three weeks after tensions flared over commentary around gold royalties and community contributions from gold miners.

Mayor John Bowler and Chief Executive John Walker publicly criticised some mining companies and Government departments for not contributing enough money to the community or doing enough to prioritise residential workers over FIFO.

Mr Bowler said the meeting provided the City a chance to share examples of companies which had dropped the ball.

“The message we gave to Paul Everingham and everyone else I have spoken to during Diggers week is in a way the mining industry just got the wrong impression about what we were saying,” he said.

“I am glad for that because it has made them focus on our issues more than they have done for a long time and how we want to help them.

“This is a win for the mining companies, a win for the workers so they can tuck their kids into beds at night, and a win for our community that we have more people living here and mining companies are spending more money here.”

Mr Everingham said the meeting had helped the City and chamber come to an understanding.

“Both the mayor and CEO expressed strong support for the mining industry and, in particular, the gold industry,” he said.

“At the end we had a good chat about childcare...and some of the innovative things they are doing in that space to retain people in Kalgoorlie.

“We said we want to co-operate with the city and we want to work together wherever possible rather than against each other.”

Councillors voted last month to undertake research into the impact FIFO has on the social and economic wellbeing of the Kalgoorlie-Boulder community.

A tender to conduct the research was released in July. It is hoped the study will be ready by the local government elections in October.

Image: Stock Image, Getty Images.